Monday, January 2, 2017


1
00:00:11,769 --> 00:00:12,860
Fridays are awesome.

2
00:00:12,860 --> 00:00:16,840
I`m Carl Azuz with your commercial-free news
source for the classroom.

3
00:00:16,840 --> 00:00:21,850
First up this March 20th, President Obama
announced a new executive order yesterday.

4
00:00:21,850 --> 00:00:24,689
It requires U.S. government agencies to reduce
their

5
00:00:24,689 --> 00:00:29,750
greenhouse gas emissions. The president says
he wants a 40 percent reduction over the next

6
00:00:29,750 --> 00:00:32,390
10 years in the types of emissions that many

7
00:00:32,390 --> 00:00:35,820
scientists say contribute to climate change.

8
00:00:35,820 --> 00:00:40,10
Government buildings will have to reduce energy
use. Government agencies will have to replace

9
00:00:40,10 --> 00:00:42,570
their vehicles with lower emissions ones,

10
00:00:42,570 --> 00:00:43,660
like hybrids.

11
00:00:43,660 --> 00:00:48,828
But this is an order not approved by Congress,
and it`s limited to government property only,

12
00:00:48,829 --> 00:00:51,50
which makes up a relatively small source of

13
00:00:51,50 --> 00:00:56,131
greenhouse gas emissions. Republicans say
decisions like this hurt American jobs. And

14
00:00:56,131 --> 00:00:58,830
like other executive orders, the next president
could

15
00:00:58,830 --> 00:01:01,40
reverse this decision.

16
00:01:01,40 --> 00:01:06,80
President Obama also made news yesterday for
suggesting that voting should be mandatory

17
00:01:06,80 --> 00:01:10,150
in the US. At a town hall event in Cleveland,
Ohio, he

18
00:01:10,150 --> 00:01:16,190
was asked how to offset the influence of money
in politics. The president said if everybody

19
00:01:16,190 --> 00:01:18,920
voted, it would be, quote, "transformative."

20
00:01:18,920 --> 00:01:23,340
Twenty-six countries require their citizens
to vote. In some places, like Australia and

21
00:01:23,340 --> 00:01:26,280
Belgium, people can get fined if they don`t.
And if

22
00:01:26,280 --> 00:01:29,109
they don`t pay that fine in Belgium, they
can be jailed.

23
00:01:29,109 --> 00:01:34,600
The U.S. has a relatively low voter turnout
rate among wealthier democracies.

24
00:01:34,600 --> 00:01:40,729
In the 2012 presidential election, just over
57 percent of all eligible voters voted. In

25
00:01:40,730 --> 00:01:44,210
the 2014 midterm elections, it was just under
37

26
00:01:44,210 --> 00:01:47,439
percent. The midterms usually have lower turnout.

27
00:01:47,439 --> 00:01:52,279
Critics say the freedom to vote also comes
the freedom not to vote. And they say that

28
00:01:52,279 --> 00:01:56,829
passing a law and then enforcing it would
be hard to do.

29
00:01:56,829 --> 00:01:59,589
Roll Call

30
00:01:59,590 --> 00:02:04,340
Delaware has several nicknames -- The Diamond
State, The Small Wonder, The Blue Hen State,

31
00:02:04,340 --> 00:02:05,560
The First State.

32
00:02:05,560 --> 00:02:10,869
Our first Roll Call school is from this state.
In Newcastle, we`re happy to see John G. Leach

33
00:02:10,869 --> 00:02:11,980
School is watching.

34
00:02:11,980 --> 00:02:16,649
Now to sportsman`s paradise, or the Sugar
State, or The Pelican State. The Wolves are

35
00:02:16,650 --> 00:02:19,390
with us from St. Paul`s School. It`s in Covington,

36
00:02:19,390 --> 00:02:20,390
Louisiana.

37
00:02:20,390 --> 00:02:25,450
And in The Grand Canyon State, hello to Gila
Ridge High. The Hawks are hovering over Huma,

38
00:02:25,450 --> 00:02:26,450
Arizona.

39
00:02:26,450 --> 00:02:29,890
There`s a lot of celestial science surrounding
us this week.

40
00:02:29,890 --> 00:02:34,470
First, the solar eclipse we told you about.
It`s visible for a couple of minutes, anyway,

41
00:02:34,470 --> 00:02:37,640
in parts of Europe, Northern Asia and North
Africa.

42
00:02:37,640 --> 00:02:42,859
Second, the spring equinox -- it`s today,
the official first day of spring. Day and

43
00:02:42,860 --> 00:02:45,860
night will be about equally as long, with
the sun shining

44
00:02:45,860 --> 00:02:47,780
directly over the equator.

45
00:02:47,780 --> 00:02:54,70
Third, scientists say a solar storm like this
one sent some serious space weather our way.

46
00:02:54,70 --> 00:02:56,530
When bursts of energy from our closest star
hit the

47
00:02:56,530 --> 00:03:02,320
Earth`s atmosphere, auroras, these bands of
light, lit up areas farther north and south

48
00:03:02,320 --> 00:03:03,320
than usual.

49
00:03:03,320 --> 00:03:08,150
Yes, we had one of the more severe, potential
disruptive, geomagnetic storms that we`ve

50
00:03:08,150 --> 00:03:09,150
seen in about a

51
00:03:09,150 --> 00:03:13,670
10 year period, as a pair of solar flares
ejected from the sun on Sunday morning arrived

52
00:03:13,670 --> 00:03:16,280
at the Earth`s magnetic field, the Earth`s
magnetosphere on

53
00:03:16,280 --> 00:03:20,320
Tuesday morning. And the way they interact
with the Earth`s magnetic field is what essentially

54
00:03:20,320 --> 00:03:22,859
leads to seeing these colorations of yellows,
greens

55
00:03:22,860 --> 00:03:27,320
and also reds. And they get deflected off
toward the polar regions. This particular

56
00:03:27,320 --> 00:03:30,510
event being so strong, we had the ability
to see that across

57
00:03:30,510 --> 00:03:34,530
some of the lower latitudes of the world,
at least a little farther south than what

58
00:03:34,530 --> 00:03:35,530
you typically would see.

59
00:03:35,530 --> 00:03:39,170
But the most common colors are the colors
of green there, as they -- the particles begin

60
00:03:39,170 --> 00:03:40,309
to collide with oxygen.

61
00:03:40,310 --> 00:03:44,270
A little less common is when you have the
blues, the violets, the purples, as we have

62
00:03:44,270 --> 00:03:46,910
the particles colliding with nitrogen. And
then you

63
00:03:46,910 --> 00:03:50,970
get up to the rarest of the types, the red
coloration, and this is where high altitude

64
00:03:50,970 --> 00:03:54,420
oxygen interacts with the particulars of the
solar flare once

65
00:03:54,420 --> 00:03:56,260
it arrives across the Earth.

66
00:03:56,260 --> 00:04:00,569
But that was the perspective on Tuesday. The
area, as far as the viewing points, as far

67
00:04:00,569 --> 00:04:03,40
south as, really, the northern portion of
the United

68
00:04:03,40 --> 00:04:07,90
States, the Midwestern U.S., the Northeastern
U.S., notice portions of Northwestern Europe,

69
00:04:07,90 --> 00:04:09,840
from Glasgow out there toward Oslo. St. Petersburg

70
00:04:09,840 --> 00:04:13,840
also had the potential to see some of this.
And we certainly know we`ve seen video coming

71
00:04:13,840 --> 00:04:16,310
in over New Zealand, Christchurch, to Hobart,
some of the

72
00:04:16,310 --> 00:04:20,699
other viewing areas of interest with this
unusual and powerful solar event.

73
00:04:20,699 --> 00:04:25,90
Typically, 10 p.m. to 2:00 a.m. the best time
to see it clear nights. Well, far away from

74
00:04:25,90 --> 00:04:28,99
major city light pollution, the best setup,
as well.

75
00:04:28,100 --> 00:04:32,430
And around March and September, the equinox
period also a good time to see it. And hence

76
00:04:32,430 --> 00:04:33,800
why it`s a good time right now.

77
00:04:33,800 --> 00:04:40,110
If you have the possibility, get outside and
take a look.

78
00:04:40,110 --> 00:04:41,110
That`s Random

79
00:04:41,110 --> 00:04:44,539
Back in high school, some of my teachers would
play classical music to help us learn.

80
00:04:44,539 --> 00:04:45,610
Did it work?

81
00:04:45,610 --> 00:04:51,460
Well it does in rats. A study in the late
1990s found that rats that repeatedly heard

82
00:04:51,460 --> 00:04:54,270
the music of Mozart were better at finding
their way

83
00:04:54,270 --> 00:04:59,270
through mazes than rats who didn`t. Music
from minimalist composers like Philip Glass

84
00:04:59,270 --> 00:05:05,60
or just plain white noise did not have the
same effects.

85
00:05:05,60 --> 00:05:07,569
Now, that`s Ratdom.

86
00:05:07,569 --> 00:05:12,430
Doves are helping a U.S.-based company map
the world -- not the birds. Though these doves

87
00:05:12,430 --> 00:05:14,939
aren`t much bigger, they operate much higher
-- about as

88
00:05:14,939 --> 00:05:20,60
high as the International Space Station, hundreds
of miles over our heads. They cost less than

89
00:05:20,60 --> 00:05:22,300
conventional satellites, but they don`t last
much

90
00:05:22,300 --> 00:05:25,409
longer than a year before they burn up in
the atmosphere.

91
00:05:25,409 --> 00:05:28,590
Still, businesses are taking notice.

92
00:05:28,590 --> 00:05:36,90
Earth as seen from the surface of the moon.
Moving closer and it still looks much the

93
00:05:36,90 --> 00:05:38,590
same. What

94
00:05:38,591 --> 00:05:45,300
you don`t see from either distance is that
our planet is constantly changing. We haven`t

95
00:05:45,300 --> 00:05:50,330
kept a close satellite eye on all this.

96
00:05:50,330 --> 00:05:56,998
Well, that`s about to change. There`s a company
here in San Francisco with an ambition that`s

97
00:05:56,999 --> 00:05:59,349
out of this world -- to map

98
00:05:59,349 --> 00:06:03,620
the Earth like it`s never been mapped before.

99
00:06:03,620 --> 00:06:09,120
We`ve invented a miniaturized satellite that
allows us to build the world`s biggest constellation

100
00:06:09,120 --> 00:06:11,400
of Earth imaging

101
00:06:11,400 --> 00:06:12,400
satellites.

102
00:06:12,400 --> 00:06:17,900
Chris Boshuizen is a physicist who`s always
been fascinated by space. After developing

103
00:06:17,900 --> 00:06:20,669
several satellites for NASA, he set up a company

104
00:06:20,669 --> 00:06:25,680
with two friends on Christmas Day, 2010.

105
00:06:25,680 --> 00:06:30,29
This is an actual one-to-one scale model of
our satellite. This usually pops out of a

106
00:06:30,29 --> 00:06:31,409
pod. The wings fall down

107
00:06:31,410 --> 00:06:36,680
here on the side and these wings are our solar
panels that we use for -- for collecting solar

108
00:06:36,680 --> 00:06:39,120
power and recharging our batteries. This is
a high

109
00:06:39,120 --> 00:06:44,89
resolution industrial camera, scientific-grade
camera that we use for collecting the images.

110
00:06:44,89 --> 00:06:49,240
So that`s -- essentially you can view it kind
of like a glorified Web cam in a box with

111
00:06:49,240 --> 00:06:51,229
a computer and some radios.

112
00:06:51,229 --> 00:06:55,490
So we have currently 20 satellites in orbit.
You can see them here in -- in their orbits,

113
00:06:55,490 --> 00:06:57,770
in which they were placed by their rocket.
The

114
00:06:57,770 --> 00:07:00,930
satellites come out from behind the shadow
of the Earth and when they`re in sunlight,

115
00:07:00,930 --> 00:07:04,199
they take pictures of the ground continuously.

116
00:07:04,199 --> 00:07:08,181
Once they have enough pictures, they pass
over one of our ground stations. And what

117
00:07:08,181 --> 00:07:11,89
we get looks like this.

118
00:07:11,89 --> 00:07:20,529
Vast evolving landscapes, a tapestry of changing
microclimates, ecosystems and land use.

119
00:07:20,529 --> 00:07:26,69
We currently have a large number of customers
in agriculture, mining and resources, energy,

120
00:07:26,69 --> 00:07:29,120
as well as finance. So being

121
00:07:29,120 --> 00:07:34,370
able to see the planet changing and how people
are undertaking their economic activity, where

122
00:07:34,370 --> 00:07:37,279
they`re investing and what they`re doing has

123
00:07:37,279 --> 00:07:38,279
tremendous value.

124
00:07:38,279 --> 00:07:44,520
It hasn`t always been a smooth ride. They
lost some 26 doves in a rocket explosion in

125
00:07:44,520 --> 00:07:48,619
October last year, just seconds after lift-off.

126
00:07:48,619 --> 00:07:56,499
Despite this setback, they hope to have a
constellation of 100 or so satellites by 2016.

127
00:07:56,499 --> 00:08:02,270
They have a mission, one they`ve had since
setting up the company, to help safeguard

128
00:08:02,270 --> 00:08:03,729
our fragile planet.

129
00:08:03,729 --> 00:08:06,58
Before We Go

130
00:08:06,59 --> 00:08:12,801
A new type of car could be headed to a road
near you. The difference is, this one can

131
00:08:12,801 --> 00:08:15,748
fly. I don`t mean speed, I mean take off from

132
00:08:15,749 --> 00:08:21,439
a runway and fly. It has collapsible wings.
Its top speed on the road is estimated to

133
00:08:21,439 --> 00:08:26,569
be around 99 miles per hour. In the air, 124
miles per hour.

134
00:08:26,569 --> 00:08:30,830
You can`t buy it yet. It`s still being developed.
But it could be available in two to three

135
00:08:30,830 --> 00:08:31,830
years.

136
00:08:31,830 --> 00:08:32,829
The cost?

137
00:08:32,830 --> 00:08:36,529
Several hundred thousand euros. In other words,
a lot.

138
00:08:36,529 --> 00:08:40,210
But if you have the kind of budget where the
sky is the limit, you`ll have license to fly

139
00:08:40,210 --> 00:08:43,419
and drive it if you have a license to fly
and drive it.

140
00:08:43,419 --> 00:08:48,380
It certainly looks runway ready, though drivers
afraid of heights might dislike, or, at most,

141
00:08:48,380 --> 00:08:49,380
fear it.

142
00:08:49,380 --> 00:08:52,140
Have a great weekend, from all of our staff
at CNN STUDENT NEWS.

CNN Student News - January 3, 2017 - English Sub

  • Uploaded by: CTVViet
  • Views:
  • Share

    0 comments:

    Post a Comment

    English Sub

    Dailymotion

    Health

     
    Copyright © CTV Viet | CTV Viet | 8330 LBJ Freeway, Suite B130 Dallas, TX 75243 United States