Tuesday, January 10, 2017


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Major news events explained in 10 minutes.
This is CNN 10, where you can know and go.

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I'm Carl Azuz.
We're taking you to the Korean Peninsula today.

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That's where North Korea, a U.S. rival, says
America is wholly to blame for North Korea's

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nuclear program. The country has been at odds
with the U.S. and South Korea since fighting

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stopped in the Korean War in 1953.
Nowadays, the North's nuclear program is illegal,

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as far as the United Nations is concerned.
But repeated sanctions, international penalties

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and restrictions on North Korea's economy
and trade have not kept North Korea from developing

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nuclear technology.
And while some defense experts don't think

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North Korea has the ability to actually hit
the U.S. with a nuclear weapon, the North

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says it's conducted four successful nuclear
tests since 2009. It wants to have long range

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nuclear weapons and it wants the world to
know it has them.

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North Korea could launch an intercontinental
ballistic missile at anytime from any location.

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That is the message from North Korean's foreign
ministry official. This came out on Sunday,

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quoted by KCNA, the state-run media.
And they say that the only thing that they're

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waiting for is the green light from Kim Jong-un,
the North Korean leader.

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Now, also, we hear in the statements that
the reason that North Korea has found it necessary

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to carry out and develop this nuclear and
missile program is because of Washington.

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-- the U.S. hostile policy, as North Korea
calls it. And this, of course, is something

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that they have been saying for years, if not
decades, blaming Washington for what they

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say is their need for self-defense.
Now, also on Sunday, we did hear from U.S.

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defense secretary, saying on NBC's "Meet the
Press", that this program from North Korea

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is a serious threat. Also saying that the
U.S. military is prepared to shoot down any

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missile, which appears to be heading towards
U.S. territory, or appears to be heading from

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the North to any territory of its allies.
But one interesting thing from this statement

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that we have been hearing from experts is
that it does appear as though North Korea

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is hoping for a different relationship with
President-elect Donald Trump when his administration

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comes into power.
Now, they did say, using the DPRK, the official

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terms for North Korea, quote, "Anyone who
wants to deal with the DPRK would be well

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advised to secure to a new way of thinking,
after having a clear understanding of it."

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Ten-second trivia:
In what part of the U.S. government do elected

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officials serve six-year terms? The Supreme
Court, presidency, House of Representatives

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or the Senate?
U.S. Constitution said Senate terms as six

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years.
That's in Article I Section 3. But it's a

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different part of the Constitution that requires
something that's playing out starting today.

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Confirmation hearings are kicking off for
President-elect Donald Trump's cabinet nominees.

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These are the president's top advisers from
a wide range of departments and its lawmakers

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who get the final say on who gets the jobs.
The anatomy of Senate confirmation.

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You have to go back to the beginning, have
to go to the Constitution, 1789, Article II,

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Section 2 Clause 2.
And it says --

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He shall nominate, and by and with the advice
and consent of the Senate, shall appoint ambassadors,

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other public ministers and consuls, judges
of the Supreme Court, and all other officers

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of the United States.
Donald Trump has announced a slew of top cabinet

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nominations, from his treasury secretary to
his attorney general. Over a thousand people,

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including the heads of all federal agencies
are going to face Senate confirmations.

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Not everyone has to get confirmed. All cabinet
level officials and a lot of their deputies

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are going to need to be confirmed. But White
House staff, think Kellyanne Conway, or Steve

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Bannon, do not.
The best way to think about Senate confirmation

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is through a series of steps. As soon as the
nominee is announced, the media attention

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starts and outside interest groups get to
roll up their sleeves.

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Step one: paper. The nominees have to fill
out a ton of forms before they can get confirmed.

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Think of it like a job interview on paper.
They have to fill out a White House questionnaire,

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passed an FBI background, and fill out a financial
disclosure form. They want to know every speech

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you gave, every club you're in.
Step number two: the photo-op. Here's where

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you get to make your debut as the nominee.
When I called you, you were on the road.

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Right exactly, yes.
I'm so glad you pulled over.

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Step three: the hearings. Remember Clarence
Thomas?

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This is a circus.
The nominee is on the hot seat for hours.

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Once the hearing is over, those same senators
are going to take a vote in committee. And

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if a nominee can get through committee, then
they go to the floor for a full vote of all

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hundred senators.
Senator, the --

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I enter a motion to reconsider the vote by
which cloture was invoke on this nomination.

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So, how many votes do you need to get officially
confirmed?

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Fifty-one is all it takes.
The Supreme Court, though, is different. You

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still need 60.
Given the Republicans had 52 seats in the

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Senate, you might think, Trump's nominees
are a shoo-in. Senate confirmation hasn't

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always been that easy.
I take this obligation freely --

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Dick Cheney was President George H.W. Bush's
second pick for defense secretary. Bush's

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original pick was former Senator John Tower
of Texas, but the Senate rejected his nomination

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in 1989.
You can pretty much guarantee that the Senate

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confirmation hearings on Trump's nominees
are going to dominate the news cycle for a

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while and maybe you won't stay awake the whole
time. But at least now you know how they work.

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A couple major news events we'll be covering
in the days ahead.

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First, the outgoing president's speech. Barack
Obama's farewell address is set for tonight

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from Chicago, Illinois. You can watch the
broadcast live on CNN at 9:00 p.m. Eastern

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and we'll have some highlights for you on
Thursday's show.

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Second, the incoming president's inauguration.
Donald Trump's swearing in is set for January

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20th. That's next Friday in the nation's capital.
You can catch that broadcast live on CNN starting

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at 9:30 a.m. Eastern and we'll have some highlights
for you the following Monday, January 23rd.

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Would you be comfortable flying on a 30-year-old
747? When it comes to commercial airplanes,

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age truly is just a number.
According to the Smithsonian Museum's "Air

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and Space" magazine, the lifespan of a commercial
airplane doesn't necessarily depend on its

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age, but on the fatigue, that pressurization
causes on the plane's metal. So, aircraft

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used on short flights and pressurized every
day may not last as long as those on longer

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flights which are pressurized less often.
But where do planes go when there are no more

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takeoffs on the horizon?
I wanted it to be a nice landing. I wanted

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it to be something everyone could remember.
I wanted to enjoy it.

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We just shut down the motion (ph) and parked
the brakes and it's hit me.

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The Boneyard.
Affectionately, we call it a boneyard, but

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for me, it's like a big aircraft enthusiast
playground.

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Airlines from around the world retire their
planes to this boneyard in Roswell, New Mexico.

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Strolling in the boneyard is a once-in-lifetime
experience. Massive jetliners that roamed

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the skies, now awaiting a depressing fate.
You can tell just from the different states

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of the aircraft, you know, which ones have
been heavily harvested.

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How many planes that have been retired are
on this field?

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On the books right now, we have 103 for American,
and probably there's another 100 out here

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from the past that are no longer on the books.
Parts taken from this Boeing 777 are worth

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more than the plane itself.
Probably within the next month, this plane

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will be crunched up, put in a truck and hauled
off to a smelter. That's its fate.

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The American Airlines jet I flew in on sits
with other new arrivals. It will likely be

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stripped to its bones for spare parts or worse,
the crusher.

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The Crusher.
Anything could go through anything. Today

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is actually my first one that I've actually
got to crush.

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This Saudi Arabian airlines MD-90 is being
destroyed after being stripped for parts.

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You probably heard of crop circles, or seeing
these (ph) what some folks are mysterious

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formations.
For "10 Out of 10" today, behold this ice,

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ice, baby. The rare and beautiful ice circle.
Check out this ice as the river revolves it.

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It's a natural phenomenon.
While some meteorologists say this form in

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eddies where water moves in a circular shape,
scientists believe ice circles are caused

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by slowly melting chunks of water that spin
as they sink, grinding away a circular shape

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at the ice border.
No wonder why passersby freeze at the sight

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of it. It's an indisputably cool discovery,
positively edifying, and though I got to go,

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my head is spinning y'all. I feel like I've
been talking in circles.

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We hope you all circle back with us tomorrow,
carving out 10 minutes again for CNN 10. I'm

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Carl Azuz.

CNN 10 Student News - January 10, 2017 - English Sub

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